Glenelg country school



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Sports and Statistics (1st semester) (1/2 credit) No prerequisite knowledge of probability, number theory or sports is required.


What are numbers? Why is 2+2=4? In the first week this course will examine basic number theory through the lens of sets, functions, and standard proof techniques. These mathematical ideas will allow the development of the intuitions underlying the science and mathematics of probability and elementary statistics, focusing on concrete applications of these techniques to the domains of games and sport. Along with the focus on statistics of sports, how the ball bounces will also be explored.

This course is designed for students who have an interest in numbers, sports, probability, and sports statistics. The primary goals of the course are two-fold: to ensure that students have a certain amount of familiarity with important mathematical concepts; and to emphasize the importance of mathematics in all facets of life, not necessarily as an indispensable tool, but rather as another approach to viewing and questioning the world.



SCIENCE:
Biology I (1 credit) Prerequisite: Middle School Physical Science course

This course presents the major principles of biology. In this lab-centered course, students explore the characteristics and processes shared by living organisms through topics including basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, bioenergetics, cell reproduction, genetics, evolution, classification, viruses and the immune system. Primary text: Biology, Miller and Levine, 2006.


Biology II (1 credit) Prerequisite: Biology I

This course is designed to be a continuation of Biology I. Expanding on the principles of biology that students studied in the first year course, (cellular structure and cellular functions including cellular respiration, photosynthesis, DNA replication and protein synthesis, and cell division, genetics and evolution), the main focus of Biology II will be a study of the diversity of life from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. This lab oriented course surveys the organisms that are included in the six Kingdoms of Archaebacteria, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae and Animalia. Students who successfully complete this course should be well prepared to succeed in AP Biology and AP Environmental Science. Primary text: Biology, Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall, 2006.


Chemistry I (1 credit) Prerequisite : Algebra I

This introductory chemistry course focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry and their practical applications. Topics include atomic theory, bonding, formulae and nomenclature, molecular structures, phases of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and energy. Students examine topics qualitatively and quantitatively through laboratory experiments to ascertain the validity of chemical principles. The primary textbook is: Chemistry, Prentice Hall, 2008.


Chemistry I (Honors) (1 credit) Co-requisite: Algebra II

This course is designed for students with exceptional math ability and interest in science who desire a more intensive introductory chemistry course. Topics include those taught in Chemistry I as well as additional focus on thermo chemistry, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. This course explores concepts in greater depth than Chemistry I, focuses on mathematics and examines exceptions to general rules. The primary textbook is Chemistry, Prentice Hall, 2008.


Physics I (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course offers a survey of contemporary physical concepts, including classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, geometric optics, thermodynamics, and waves. The concepts will be validated through experimental work. Students are encouraged to become better observers, reporters and critical thinkers. Primary Text: Holt Physics, 2005, Serway and Faughn


Physics I Honors (1 credit) Pre/co-requisite: Pre-Calculus

Physics I Honors is an introductory, laboratory-aided, Physics course for Upper School students. This is an algebra/trigonometry based Physics curriculum that has a minimum co-requisite of Pre-calculus. Physics I Honors is a survey course of the major areas of classical and contemporary physics. The first part of the course is devoted to an in-depth study of classical Newtonian mechanics. As such, the students will explore the concepts of velocity, acceleration, vectors, forces, motion in two directions, universal gravitation, momentum and energy conservation, and work. The second part of the course will be segmented into three major areas; optics, electricity, and magnetism. Acceptance to the course is by permission of the instructor. Primary text: Physics, by Giancoli.


*Advanced Placement Biology “Advanced Placement Biology” (1 credit) Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I plus permission from the instructor

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college biology course offered to biology majors. The course presents the principles of biology (biochemistry, bioenergetics, cell structure and physiology, genetics) as well as plant, animal and human anatomy and physiology all from an evolutionary perspective. Students also learn the principles of ecology. The AP exam is taken in May. Primary text: Biology, Campbell and Reese, 8th edition, 2008.


*Advanced Placement Chemistry (1 credit) Prerequisites: Chemistry I and Algebra II
Advanced Placement Chemistry builds on the principles of general chemistry and is

designed to be the equivalent of a first year college chemistry course. This course analyzes chemical principles in great depth and emphasizes mathematical relationships. Topics include chemical bonding, states of matter, advanced stoichiometry, gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base reactions, chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. The primary textbook is: Chemistry, by Zumdahl, 7th edition.


*Advanced Placement Environmental Science (1 credit) Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I (may be taken concurrently) plus permission from the instructor

The goal for this course is to provide the students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and anthropogenic, to evaluate the relative risks associated with those problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. It is an interdisciplinary course, which embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study including biology, chemistry, geology, ecology, environmental studies, geography and government. The Glenelg Country School campus, with its pond, grassy fields and woodlands, provides a wonderful resource for field and laboratory work. The primary text for this course is: Living in the Environment, G. Tyler Miller, Jr., 15th edition, 2007.


*Advanced Placement Physics: Mechanics (1 credit) Prerequisite: Physics I, Co-requisite: Calculus Honors.

Advanced Placement Physics: Mechanics is a calculus based second-level physics course that closely follows the guidelines set forth by The College Board. Physics I is a mandatory prerequisite and Calculus is a minimum co-requisite. All students taking the course are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in physics. The focus of the class will be on classical mechanics. The basic format of the course is didactic lecturing and small group problem solving sessions. In addition, laboratory experiments demonstrating important principles and concepts will be performed. Acceptance to the course is by permission of the instructor. Primary text: Fundamentals of Physics, Halliday, Resnick and Walker.


*Advanced Placement Physics: Electricity and Magnetism (1 credit) Prerequisites: Physics I,

Co-requisite: Calculus BC

Advanced Placement Physics: Electricity and Magnetism is a calculus based second-level physics course that closely follows the guidelines set forth by The College Board. Physics I and Calculus are mandatory prerequisites. All students taking the course are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in physics. The focus of the class will be on electricity and magnetism. The basic format of the course is didactic lecturing and small group problem solving sessions. In addition, laboratory experiments demonstrating important principles and concepts will be performed. Acceptance to the course is by permission of the instructor. Primary text: Fundamentals of Physics, Halliday, Resnick and Walker.
Astronomy I & II Students may sign up for either one semester or both semesters.

Prerequisite: Completion of Pre-calculus or concurrently enrolled in pre-calculus. Both of the courses are hands-on exploratory classes. Students will learn about astronomy through the completion of labs, construction of models, and observing the sky with the GCS telescope. Both night time and day time observing sessions will be required.

Primary Texts: Astronomy Today by Chaisson and Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy by Adams, Prather, and Slater.
Astronomy I (1st semester) (1/2 credit) Students create models and learn by observation and experimentation about the connection between the Sun, Earth and Moon by:

--Tracking seasonal changes in length of day

--Tracking the Sun and observing its spots

--Observing the moon and modeling its phases

--Modeling constellations

--Modeling the solar system

--Learning about the Space Race, the Apollo missions to the Moon, and

interplanetary missions


Astronomy II (2nd semester) (1/2 credit) This course focuses more on the exploration of more distant objects in space outside the solar system by:

--observing deep sky targets

--exploring blackbody radiation, spectroscopy, and remote sensing

--exploring the characteristics of the sun

--applying solar knowledge to the stars

--learning stellar characteristics and stellar life cycles

--modeling and learning about the Milky Way Galaxy

--applying this knowledge to other galaxies

--learning the basics of cosmology
Anatomy and Physiology (1 credit) Prerequisite: Biology I. Co-requisite: Chemistry I

This course is directed towards Junior and Senior students with an interest in biomedical sciences. The course presents the principles of anatomy and physiology and includes topics such as anatomical terminology, organization of the body, histology, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, sensory system, integumentary system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system and digestive system. The course also has a lab component, including animal dissection. Text: Essential of Human Anatomy and Physiology, Shier, Butler and Lewis; The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Sacks.


Organic Chemistry (1 credit) Prerequisites: AP Chemistry, Algebra II

This course is a comprehensive study of the nomenclature, structures, conformation, stereochemistry, reactions, syntheses and spectroscopy of organic compounds. Focus is on simple alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes, alcohols, amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, ethers and esters. Attention is given to applications of organic chemistry in physiology and medicine. The primary textbook is Organic Chemistry by Morrison and Boyd. This course is offered according to the demand of student interest.



FINE ARTS:
Dramatic Design and Literature (1st semester) (1/2 credit)

Dramatic Design and Literature takes an in-depth look at classic and contemporary works by accomplished playwrights and the designs that have been associated with the staging of their plays.  The course is divided into two sections.  The first section of the course (first quarter) we examine three extraordinary plays.  The objective of the first section of the course is to bring the students’ awareness of each text to a new level and to see beyond the written word, to the authors’ intention.  The second half of Dramatic Design and Literature focuses on the design process.  The students are taken through the steps that are associated with designing a set for a theatrical production all the way up to a working model of a set. 


Digital Film Making  (2nd semester) (1/2 credit)

This course will introduce students to all aspects of digital video production. Students will write, produce, direct and edit several films throughout the course. Techniques in camera operation, cinematography and directing as well as special effects will be taught and explored. Students will gain an appreciation for the complex and collaborative nature of film making, as well as first-hand experience planning and directing a film.


Theatre I (1 credit)

The student is introduced to aspects of acting, directing, oral interpretation and playwriting. Improvisation is used as a class tool to develop the imagination and the fundamental tool of risk-taking in performance. In the first semester, students participate in a class performance project. Theatre I is introduced to a survey of theatre history. The spring Evening of the Arts gives students the opportunity to share works developed in class.  The year concludes with an performance final. Text: various texts and scripts.


Advanced Theatre (1 credit) Prerequisite: Theatre I

Advanced levels of theatre work in common space and on mutual projects. The student continues to explore a deeper investigation of character development seeking to extend his range of emotional, psychological and presentational choice. Various styles of theatrical presentation and study of theatre in society is researched. Skills are honed by exploring various methods of "telling the story" in acting, directing, oral interpretation and playwriting. Text: various texts and scripts.


Instrumental Music - Jazz Fusion (1 credit) Prerequisite: Audition with instructor    

This year-long course is intended for the student who enjoys making music and is personally committed to daily practice & rehearsals.  Students will audition, and then grouped into smaller ensembles and class periods.  Students receive fundamental training on rehearsal techniques, ensemble work ethics, and preparation/planning for upcoming performances.  If you enjoy making music, this course is for you! Instrumentalists: Guitarists, Drummers, Bassists, etc.  


Instrumental Music - Strings/Woodwinds Ensemble (1 credit) Prerequisite: Audition with instructor    

This year-long course is intended for the student who enjoys making music and is personally committed to daily practice & rehearsals.  Students will audition, and then grouped into smaller ensembles and class periods.  Students receive fundamental training on rehearsal techniques, ensemble work ethics, and preparation/planning for upcoming performances.  If you enjoy making music, this course is for you! Instrumentalists: Strings, Winds, and Brass.




Music Theory
(1st and/or 2nd semester) (1/2 credit per semester)

Music Theory is designed for students who wish to improve their music reading ability or learn basic music theory skills. Beginners and more advanced students are welcome.

Beginning topics include the grand staff, treble and bass clef notation, note and rest values, time and key signatures, major scales, major and minor intervals, chords, dynamics, and musical symbols and articulation.

Intermediate topics include minor scales, transposing music, augmented and diminished intervals, primary and secondary chords, syncopation, inversions of chords, passing and neighboring tones, and the blues scale and chord progression. Students will create chords to accompany a melody they compose and learn how music is "put together." Students will learn to follow the musical "road map," including repeat signs and endings. Students will work with the teacher relating the piano keyboard to class work.

Advanced topics include four-part harmony, transposing instruments, cadences, and modulation and composing/arranging music.

The text is Essentials of Music Theory (Complete). This course may be repeated for credit.


Chorus (1 credit)

This year-long performing group is open to all students in grades 9-12, regardless of prior vocal experience. The Chorus sings a wide variety of choral literature, including contemporary, folk, spirituals, Broadway and classical songs. Students study correct singing technique, including correct posture, relaxation, breathing, vowel placement and general care of the vocal cords. Each student receives a CD to learn certain parts of the songs individually. The Glenelg Chorus performs several times throughout the year. This course may be repeated for credit. Instructor’s permission is required for Chorus.


Chorus Practicum (year-long) (1/2 credit)

This year-long performing group is open to all students in grades 11-12, regardless of prior vocal experience. The singers in Chorus Practicum perform with the Upper School Chorus and meet 3 days out of the 7 day cycle. The Chorus sings a wide variety of choral literature, including contemporary, folk, spirituals, Broadway and classical songs. Students study correct singing technique, including correct posture, relaxation, breathing, vowel placement and general care of the vocal cords. Each student receives a CD to learn certain parts of the songs individually. The Glenelg Chorus performs several times throughout the year. This course may be repeated for credit. Instructor’s permission is required for Chorus Practicum.

 

Photography I (1 credit)

Students learn the basic technical skills of black and white photography, learn about darkroom safety, receive an introduction to the history of photography, and create a photographic portfolio with a personal voice. The students should have a working condition 35mm SLR camera (old or new), lenses, if any, and filters, film, and photo paper (8x10-100 or 250 sheets). The class size is limited to10 students. One field trip per semester, all school day.



Photography II (1 credit) Prerequisite: Photo I or permission from the instructor

Students expand photographic skills to a creative/fine art level. They explore other photographic formats from 35mm to medium and large formats. Students also learn more about different kinds of image processing, besides regular black and white photography, and some color. The students should be willing and extremely interested in creative/fine art photos. They should have a working condition 35mm SLR camera (old or new), lenses, if any, filters, film, photo paper (8x10 - 100 or 250 sheets), and Holga camera. The class size is limited to10 students. One field trip per semester, all school day.

 

 Digital Photography (1 credit) Prerequisite: Photo I or permission from the instructor 



Students will be taught the basics of digital photography.  Students will take pictures and learn how to save, store, and retouch the images. They will work with Adobe Photoshop CS3 to learn how to enhance the images and prepare them for printing.  We will print up to 11x14 sized images on the classroom inkjet printer. Students will be given variety of assignments. The students must have their own digital camera, provide their own inkjet photo papers and if possible, their own laptops to work individually during the classes.

 

Advanced Photography (1 credit) Prerequisite: Photo II or permission from the instructor 

Students will work on their own projects to develop their individual portfolios for college. This can be done digitally or analog. The students are required to complete 20 11x14 matted photographs by the end of the year. The instructor will critique the finished work with each student.
Pottery I (1st semester) (1/2 credit) No prerequisite

This class will introduce the joy of hand made vessels in clay. Beginning with very simple and basic techniques such as pinch pots, coil building and slab construction, students will construct a series of simple pots. They will progress to creating a teapot based on a fairy tale with two matching cups.


Pottery II (2nd semester) (1/2 credit) Prerequisite: Pottery I

Students will work on more complex and advanced vessel forms and be introduced to the pottery wheel. They will be encouraged to combine different forms and techniques together to create unique designs. Their final project will be the reproduction of an ancient pottery form.


Pottery III (1st semester) (½ credit) Prerequisite: Pottery I& II

Students will continue to develop skills with clay. They will be introduced to the potter’s wheel, and will work on a set of original dishes, combining wheel throwing with hand building.

 

Pottery IV (2nd semester) (½ credit) Prerequisite: Pottery I, II, III

Students will continue to develop their wheel throwing skills. They will work on an abstract sculptural form combining the wheel thrown with the hand built ceramic techniques.


Printmaking and Painting (1/2 credit)

Students will explore the relationship between painting, creating a unique image, and printmaking, creating a series of images from a matrix—wood, linoleum, silkscreen. They will work in a variety of media in both painting and printmaking, including those that can apply to both approaches. Although we will work on serial images, students will also use painterly approaches to printmaking through monoprint and monotype. The work from this course could contribute to students’ AP portfolios.


Props and Costume Construction (1st semester) (1/2 credit)

In the Prop and Costume Construction class, students will learn hands on techniques for designing, making, and finishing Props and Costumes for GCS productions. In the Costume Unit, students will learn the "in's and out's" of sewing with a basic sewing machine, a Serger machine, and will learn to hand sew and decorate completed costumes. Students will look at the history of clothing and costuming for the stage, and will be instrumental in designing costumes for a GCS production. In the Prop Unit, students will learn basic prop making techniques: wire work, decorative painting, sculpting with fabric, papier-mâché, and Styrofoam, using and manipulating leather to create masks, as well as creating special effects such as "blood packets" and "weeping wounds". Students will be responsible for creative projects and writing assignments based on in-class lectures.


Sculpture I (1st semester) (1/2 credit) No prerequisite

This is a beginning sculpture class. Students will be introduced to the materials and processes available for fabricating three dimensional objects. Students will start with clay - the most malleable and versatile of all sculpture materials. They will progress to wire forms, and then create a mask in papier-mâché decorated with mixed media.


Sculpture II (2nd semester) (1/2 credit) Prerequisite: Sculpture I

This class will continue teaching the basic skills and principles of sculpture. Students will start with a kinetic sculpture: a flying bird or dragon in wood with moveable wings. Some simple carving techniques will be introduced with soft Basswood. The use of plaster as a casting material will be investigated using hand made clay molds and rubber latex.


Sculpture III (1st semester) (1/2 credit)

At this point students will experiment with stone carving in alabaster, a soft luminous marble. We will also continue to experiment in clay with more complex sculptural designs and with any other materials available.



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