Glenelg country school



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Psychology (2nd semester) (1/2 credit)


This course is a basic introduction to the field of psychology. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. The course provides a broad overview of the field and introduces the different aspects and subfields of psychology. Topics of study include: Biological Bases of Behavior, Motivation, Learning, Cognition, Sensation and Perception, Memory, Language, Social Behavior, Development, Intelligence, Therapies, Psychological Disorders, Life Span Development, and Personality. The course will include historic and recent approaches to the field. It also will examine fundamental methods of scientific research.
Roman Civilization (1/2 credit)

In Roman Civilization, we will explore the culture, history, and literature of ancient Rome. By reading the works of authors such as Cato, Cicero, Caesar, Ovid, Catullus, Vergil, Tacitus, and Pliny the Younger, we will evaluate the culture of an empire that dominated the Mediterranean for over 2000 years. This process of evaluation will not be limited to ancient sources, but will also include modern sources which are reflective of our Roman heritage, such as opera, film, and literature. It is this comparison of ancient with modern cultural artifacts that will serve as the basis for reflection on what it is to be a citizen of the modern world.



Science Fiction (1st semester) (1/2 credit)

Science fiction has become one of the fastest-growing and most creative genres of American literature. The technological innovations of the past century and the fundamental changes they have wrought on the world have sparked great interest, both in literature and film, in the shape of the future. This class will briefly trace the history of science fiction and explore how the genre has split in many directions to speculate about the possible futures that both fascinate and frighten us.


Shakespeare (2nd semester) (1/2 credit)

            This course explores the works of William Shakespeare, focusing on his mastery of the English language and his deep understanding of the human condition.  Topics covered will include literary devices, poetic devices, dramatic structure, character study, and modern interpretation through art, film, literature, and music.  This course strives to resurrect and demystify Shakespeare by revealing how Shakespeare’s plays lived in performance, and continue to inspire artists in modern times.  Students will be responsible for quizzes, writing assignments, and creative art projects based on the reading.  Plays: Pericles Prince of Tyre, Love’s Labours Lost, Taming of the Shrew, and Macbeth


20th Century U.S. History (1/2 credit)

This class follows the same outline of the previously offered International Relations class. It will not only focus on America’s relationship to the rest of the world, but also relevant cultural movements shaping the U.S. and the world in the Twentieth Century. Special topics will include the Middle East, dissident movements in Eastern Europe, and the Soviet Union, American counter culture of the 1960’s, and American responses to Sept. 11.


Western Philosophy (1st semester) (1/2 credit)

This seminar course will introduce students to the major western philosophers and their works. Students will explore ideas such as justice, virtue, morality, love and many others in daily conversations. Students will be assigned daily readings (usually less than 15 pages) and classes will be in seminar format. Participation in our conversations is required. A philosophic essay will be written on a book of the student's choice.


*Advanced Placement Art History (1 credit) This course requires permission of instructor.

The Advanced Placement course in Art History is designed to provide the same benefits to upper school students as are provided by an introductory college course in art history: an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within a historical and cultural context. Students learn to look at works of art with intelligence and sensitivity, examining the major art forms of the past and of various cultures, as well as those of our own time and environment. Students may receive advanced placement or credit at colleges and universities.


*Advanced Placement English Literature (1 credit) This course requires permission of instructor.

This course will prepare students for the Advanced Placement English and Composition examination. Students will prepare for the exam as they cultivate their reading practices through the careful study of great works, by learning and applying the terms of literary discourse, and by refining their ability to compose logical, coherent, and thoughtful timed essays. In short, students will develop more meaningful habits of reading and writing.


*Advanced Placement European History (1 credit) This course requires permission of instructor.

This class provides a college-level introduction to European history from the Late Middle Ages to the fall of the Berlin Wall. We will explore the cultural, economic, political and social developments of the region and their effects on the global culture of today. This class will also prepare students for the Advanced Placement European History examination. Students will be expected to complete extensive readings and to participate actively in class discussions.


*Advanced Placement U.S. Government (1/2 credit) This course requires permission of instructor.

This class will prepare students for the Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics exam. The exam and course focus on America’s constitutional underpinnings, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, governmental institutions, public policy, and civil rights and liberties. Mastery of the basic facts of this material is essential. Students will also build skills to critically evaluate government and politics, analyze the relationship between people and institutions, and form written arguments using basic data relevant to government and politics.


*Advanced Placement U. S. History (1/2 credit) This course requires permission of instructor.

This is a different approach to preparing for an AP test. Instead of attempting to re- teach the entire survey class of U.S. History, this class will focus on reading specific books about different historical periods. It is meant to build upon the solid foundation provided Junior year. The reading list has not been set but will include essays from the Federalist Papers, excerpts from De Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, a few Presidential Biographies, and some general histories. The class is open to Juniors and Seniors at the permission of your Junior year history teacher.




WORLD AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES:
Chinese I “Beginning Chinese” (1 credit)

This is the first of a four-year sequence of Chinese communicative proficiency in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will learn pinyin (Chinese pronunciation) and will learn to write Chinese characters. Chinese culture, geography and calligraphy are also introduced. Textbook: Ni Hao: Level I, with the student's workbook level 1, by Paul and Shumang Fredlein.


Chinese II “Continuation of Beginning Chinese” (1 credit)

The second year of Chinese consists of continued improvement in the four language skills. Grammar concepts are introduced and reviewed, and an intense study of vocabulary begins. Students are expected to have a good command of the present and preterit tenses by the end of the year. Chinese culture, geography, calligraphy, and literature will continue to be explored. Textbook: Integrated Chinese: Level l/l, with the student's workbook Level 1/1, by Yao Liu.


Chinese III (1 credit)

This course reinforces communication skills and includes more sophisticated writing and spontaneous speaking. Events are discussed in the present, past and future tenses. Topics include discussing shopping, weather, transportation, dining, asking directions, and other social situations. Students continue to study the culture of the Chinese-speaking world through reading, lectures, discussions and use of media and technology. Textbook: Integrated Chinese: level 1/1 and level 1/2 by Tao-chung Yao, with the student's workbook level 1/1 and level 1/2.


Chinese IV (1 credit)

This course reinforces communication skills and includes more sophisticated writing and spontaneous speaking. Events are discussed in the present, past and future tenses. Topics include discussing seeing a doctor, dating, renting an apartment, going to the post office, sports, travel, hometown, and going to the airport. Students continue to study the culture of the Chinese-speaking world through reading, lectures, discussions and use of media and technology. Textbook: Integrated Chinese: level 1/2 by Tao-chung Yao, with the student's workbook level 1/2.


French I: First Year (1 credit)

In this course, students are introduced to basic French syntax and vocabulary. The skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are stressed equally. Additionally, students are exposed to concepts such as cultural relativism, language theory, and Franco-American relations. Students complete many projects, both individually and in groups. Newspaper articles, magazines, radio broadcasts, movies and TV, internet-based listening activities, and a software program, in addition to music and cooking, are incorporated into the curriculum. Text, workbook, and reader: Allez, viens! (level 1).


French II: Second Year (1 credit)

In this course, grammatical concepts from French I are reviewed and then followed up by the more intense study of object pronouns, the passé composé, and the imperfect. Students complete many projects, both individually and in groups. Equal attention is given to the development of students’ abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue to explore such concepts as cultural relativism, language theory, and Franco-American relations. Students complete many projects, both individually and in groups. Newspaper articles, magazines, radio broadcasts, movies and TV, internet-based listening activities, and a software program, in addition to music and cooking, are incorporated into the curriculum.


French III: Intermediate French (1 credit)

French III exposes students to the more advanced syntax and vocabulary. By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of the future, conditional, pluperfect, and subjunctive. Students begin to write essays, converse solely in French and read more extensive texts such as Saint-Exupéry’s Le Petit Prince. Equal attention is given to the development of students’ abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue to explore such concepts as cultural relativism, language theory, and Franco-American relations. They complete many projects, both individually and in groups. Newspaper articles, magazines, radio broadcasts, movies and TV, internet-based listening activities, and a software program, in addition to music and cooking, are incorporated into the curriculum. Texts and workbook: Collage: Révision de Grammaire, Collage: Variétés Culturelles, Collage: Cahier d’exercice.


French IV: French History and Literature (1 credit)

In addition to the continued study and review of advanced French grammar, students are exposed to the major events that have formed and shaped contemporary France. We shall start with the arrival of early man in what is today south-central France, and end with a study of racism and anti-Semitism in a country where immigrants now account for a large percentage of the current population. Attention is given to the development of students’ abilities in speaking and listening while emphasis is placed on reading and writing. Students write essays and read literary works, both in their entirely and in abbreviated form. Students continue to explore such concepts as cultural relativism, language theory, and Franco-American relations. The class includes projects which students will complete both individually and in groups. Newspaper articles, magazines, radio broadcasts, movies and TV, internet-based listening activities, and a software program, in addition to music and cooking, are incorporated into the curriculum. Texts and workbook: Trésors du Temps, Trésors du Temps Workbook.


*French V: Advanced Placement French Language (1 credit)

The Advanced Placement French Language curriculum prepares students for the AP French Language exam which takes place at the end of the academic year. Students will also be prepared for the SAT II Achievement Test in French should they wish to take it. Equal attention is given to the development of students’ abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students write several essays, study grammar in nuanced detail, and converse and debate solely in French. Students continue to explore such concepts as cultural relativism, language theory, and Franco-American relations. During the first and second quarters, we will read and discuss Camus’ L’Etranger. Students complete many projects, both individually and in groups. Newspaper articles, magazines, radio broadcasts, movies and TV, internet-based listening activities, and a software program, in addition to music and cooking, are incorporated into the curriculum. Workbooks: Advanced Placement French: Preparing for the Language Examination, Une Fois Pour Toutes.


*French VI: Advanced Placement French Literature (1 credit) Prerequisite: French V or its equivalent

The Advanced Placement Program in French Literature is designed to introduce students who have advanced language skills to the formal study of a representative body of literary texts in French. The AP French Literature course has the following objectives: a) proficiency in the fundamental language skills that enable the students to 1. read and understand prose and verse of moderate difficulty and mature content; 2. formulate and express critical opinions and judgments in correct oral and written French; b) the ability to read and analyze critically and to discuss perceptively representative works of French literature. Texts are chosen by the National Committee of AP French Scholars and are announced yearly.


Conversational French (1 credit)

Conversational French is ideal for students who have completed at least the French III level grammar course. It is designed to expand and practice French language oral skills introduced in levels I, II, and III. Classroom situations include a majority of listening and speaking activities. Textbooks include Collage: Conversation/Activities, current newspaper articles, popular French magazines, language cassettes and videos in the target language and other materials at the discretion of the teacher. Evaluation is based on preparation for class, participation in class and on the amount and quality of the language spoken in class.


Latin I: First-Year Latin (1 credit)

This course offers an introduction to the grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and etymology of Latin as it was written at the time of the early Roman Empire. Students will begin reading stories written in Latin about a typical Roman family on the very first day and will be writing their own stories in this language by the second week. In this course, students will gain an appreciation of the mechanics English grammar through the act of translation. Readings in the text will also be supplemented by a survey of Greek and Roman mythology as it is presented in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Texts: Ecce Romani I, A and B


Latin II: Second-Year Latin (1 credit)

Latin II rounds out the student’s introduction to the Classical Latin language and Roman culture by continuing the storybook approach presented in year one. Students in year two will be encouraged to be active participants in their own language training by giving presentations on grammatical and historical topics. In addition to regular exercises in prose composition, students will write, direct, and act in a short one-act play showcasing their Latin prose composition skills. Texts: Ecce Romani II, A and B


Latin III: Third-Year Latin (1 credit)

Students in Latin III get an opportunity to both consolidate their knowledge of Latin grammar as well as begin reading Latin primary sources including: Julius Caesar, Cicero, and Petronius. In this course, students begin doing dictionary work and will be expected to present reports to the class on a variety of historical and literary topics. Latin prose-composition exercises will increase in complexity, requiring students to imitate the styles of various authors as they come to have a greater appreciation for the different ways in which ancient authors composed their works. At the end of year III, students in this course should be ready for the AP Vergil curriculum. Texts: Ecce Romani III, Petronius, Selections from the Satyricon, Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta Oratio, and Selections from Caesar's De Bello Gallico, Collins Gem Latin Dictionary: Second Edition


Latin IV: Fourth-Year Latin (1 credit)

Students in Latin IV get a chance to read many of the canonical authors of ancient Rome in a class focused primarily on the epic and lyric poetry of Vergil, Catullus, Horace, and Ovid. In this course, students will be expected to give oral and written reports on topics germane to our readings. Latin prose-composition exercises will in frequency, calling for students to imitate the styles of the poets of ancient Rome. At the end of year IV, students should be ready for either the AP Vergil or the AP Latin Literature curriculum. Texts: Love and Transformation: An Ovid Reader, LaFleur, ed., Catullus and Horace: Selections from their Lyric Poetry, Aronson and Boughner, eds., Selections Vergil's Aeneid Books I, IV, VI, Hall et al., eds., Collins Gem Latin Dictionary: Second Edition


Advanced Placement Latin: Vergil Fourth/Fifth Latin (1 credit)

This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination for Vergil’s Aeneid. In addition to reading large portions of the poem which T.S. Eliot once described as “the all-time classic of Europe”, students in this course will begin to think more critically about the Latin which they are reading, both in terms of its content as well as its author’s diction. Students in AP Latin will also become proficient in the scansion of the dactylic hexameter meter and will memorize sections of this poem that they will recite aloud in class. Texts: Vergil’s Aeneid: Clyde Pharr, ed., Vergil's Aeneid, 10 & 12: Pallas & Turnus, Barbara Weiden Boyd, ed., Reading Vergil's Aeneid: An Interpretive Guide, Christine Perkell, ed., Collins Gem Latin Dictionary: Second Edition


AP Latin: Latin Literature Fourth/Fifth-Year Latin (1 credit)

This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination for Latin Literature, with an emphasis on the lyric poetry of Ovid and Catullus. In addition to reading the poems that have inspired such works as Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, students in this course will begin to think more critically about the Latin which they are reading, both in terms of its content as well as its author’s diction. Students in AP Latin Literature will also become proficient in the scansion of the dactylic hexameter, elegiac couplets, and numerous other meters as well as memorize sections of these poems which they will recite aloud in class. Texts: Love and Transformation: An Ovid Reader, LaFleur, ed., Love and Betrayal: A Catullus Reader, Arnold et al., eds., Collins Gem Latin Dictionary: Second Edition


Independent Study in Latin (1 credit)

Anthology readings in Latin Literature and a survey in Roman History. Texts: TBA


Spanish I: First-Year Spanish (1 credit)

This is the first year of a three-year sequence, unified in scope, sequence, and content. It is designed to be an introduction to the language and help students acquire communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The class will focus on basic communication skills in the present and present progressive tenses and give students a working vocabulary including pronouns, nouns, verbs, and adjectives. At the same time, the course introduces Hispanic culture, geography and relevant current events. This year we will continue to use the new language lab software with new activities to reinforce concepts learned. The curriculum, EMC Paradigm’s Somos Así En Sus Marcas, Funston et al, published in 2000, is used as well as accompanying audio and visual activities from the internet, videos, and CDs.


Spanish II: Second-Year Spanish (1 credit) Pre-requisite: Spanish I or its equivalent

This is the second year of the three-year sequence and is designed to build on the skills acquired in Spanish I. Grammar concepts are reviewed and then a more intense study of verb types, tenses, and object pronouns is begun. Students are expected to have a good command of the present, preterit, and imperfect tenses as well as the imperative mood by the end of the course. Concepts of grammar are reinforced with a year long project titled “All About Me”. Students will also study Hispanic cultures in the target language. This year we will continue to use the new language lab software with new activities to reinforce concepts learned. The curriculum, EMC Paradigm’s Somos Así Listos, Funston et al, published in 2000, is used as well as diverse audio and visual activities from the internet, videos and CDs.


Spanish III: Third –Year Spanish (1 credit) Pre-requisite: Spanish II or its equivalent

This course is the third year of the three-year sequence in Spanish. It is designed to impart a greater awareness and understanding of the heritage and culture of the Spanish-speaking world through language, excerpts from Hispanic literature and history. Along with a review of grammar, new structures are introduced to complete the basic Spanish grammar. In addition to structures learned in Spanish I and II, students are expected to have a good command of the future, conditional, present perfect and pluperfect tenses, and the present subjunctive mood by the end of the course. This year we will continue to use the new language lab software with new activities to reinforce concepts learned. The curriculum, EMC Paradigm’s, Somos Así, Ya!, Funston et al,

published in 2000, is used as well diverse audio and visual activities from the internet, videos and CDs.
Spanish IV: (1 credit) Prerequisite: Spanish III or its equivalent

This course is designed to be a pre-AP year. It will begin with a review of all the grammar learned in Spanish I through III.  At this level, however, emphasis is placed on the area of reading in the target language while working on gaining aural/oral proficiency. Translation is deemphasized while students learn the skills of gaining meaning through context clues and cognates, and inferring meaning. Essay writing is also stressed, and there are several major projects of a creative nature.  Some great works of Spanish and Hispanic literature will be investigated, read, analyzed and discussed.  The course is taught almost totally in the target language.  Towards the end of the year, the class will examine the types of activities in which they will be expected to engage. The texts will include a grammar workbook and a reader.  Students are expected to have their own portable Spanish dictionary.


Spanish V: Advanced Placement Spanish Language (1 credit) Prerequisite: Spanish IV or its equivalent

The AP course for the motivated learner is designed to prepare the student for the rigors of the exam given in May by the College Board.  This exam tests the ability to do third year college work in all four areas of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. The grammar learned in levels I-IV is reentered at this advanced level.  The course is taught entirely in the target language. The books include an AP Prep workbook in addition to the regular text.  There are also many outside readings.  Students are required to read a self-chosen pleasure book and keep a log of vocabulary learned. 


Spanish VI: Advanced Placement Spanish Literature (1 credit) Prerequisite: Spanish V or its equivalent

This AP course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Spanish Literature Exam given in May.  It is designed for seniors who have already scored a 3 or above on the AP Spanish Language exam and for others at the discretion of the teacher.  Students will read and discuss the entire body of literature tested by the exam as found in Abriendo Puertas by Nextext.  It will be necessary to read both during class and in isolation in order to get through authors from Cervantes to Borges, the Middle Ages to the Present.  Some literary investigation is also required in the target language. 



MATHEMATICS:
Algebra I (1 credit) Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra

This course provides the foundation for further work in mathematics. Students will learn methods of simplifying and manipulating algebraic expressions and solving equations. They will graph functions and investigate patterns and relationship among them. Algebra I will emphasize problem-solving methods that require students to represent problems numerically, verbally, analytically and graphically.


Algebra II (1 credit)

Students will be introduced to the properties and graphs of linear and quadratic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions.


Algebra II Honors (1 credit)

This course covers the material described in Algebra II, above, but also includes conic sections, a brief introduction to probability and statistics, as well as an introduction to sequences and series. If time permits, the foundation for the study of right triangle trigonometry will be laid.


Algebraic Topics and Trigonometry (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course emphasizes mastery of algebraic expressions and forms, especially linear and quadratic forms, powers and root, and functions based on these concepts. Students study logarithmic, trigonometric, polynomial and other special functions for their abstract properties and as tools for modeling real-world situations.


Geometry (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course encourages students to make and test conjectures as well as solving problems by thinking and reasoning deductively. Students will also study geometry shapes and their areas, surface areas, volumes and geometric constructions, and transformation. Students utilize the computer, ruler, protractor and compass as tools to develop their knowledge of geometry.

 

Geometry Honors (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course covers the material described in Geometry, but also includes tessellations, manipulations of shapes on a coordinate plane, vectors, and algebraic applications of geometric concepts. This class emphasizes deduction and logical thinking, especially with two column proofs.


Pre-calculus with Trigonometry (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course focuses on solving and graphing functions, including: linear, quadratic, power, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Half of the course is devoted to an in-depth study of trigonometry. Students learn to graph trigonometric functions, manipulate trigonometric expressions using identities, and solve right and oblique triangle problems.


Pre-calculus with Trigonometry Honors (1 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II and permission of instructor.

Same as Pre-calculus above, but the class solves more difficult problems and proceeds at a quicker pace. In addition, students will begin the study of Calculus by completing a unit on limits and their properties.


Calculus Honors (1 credit) Prerequisite: Pre-calculus and recommendation from instructor.

This content of this course is similar to that of the AB Calculus curriculum, but is designed for students who have done well in Pre-calculus, who are capable of learning the material in Calculus, but who need extra time and practice with each concept. This is an excellent preparatory course for students planning on taking Calculus in college. Concepts covered in Calculus include limits, differentiation of various functions, applications of differentiation, and an introduction to integration. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of this course.



*Advanced Placement AB Calculus (1 credit) Prerequisite: Pre-calculus Honors and recommendation from instructor.

This course presents techniques and applications of derivatives of functions, which include polynomial, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Applications include, but are not limited to, problems involving related rates, velocity and acceleration, graphing, and maximization and minimization. Additionally, students will learn methods of integration and use them to calculate areas between graphs and volumes of solids of revolution. Students will become familiar with the format of the A.P. exam and learn strategies to optimize his/her score. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of this course.


*Advanced Placement BC Calculus (1 credit) Prerequisite: AB Calculus and permission of instructor.

This course is an extension, not an enhancement, of the AB Calculus course. It is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. The topics include all topics covered in AB Calculus, plus: arc length of a curve, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, indeterminate forms and L’Hopital’s Rule, infinite series, convergence tests, Taylor polynomials, Taylor and MacLaurin series, conic sections, parametric and polar equations, vectors and the geometry of space, and vector valued functions. If time permits, additional topics, not included on the AP Exam, may be taught for enrichment.


*Advanced Placement Statistics (1 credit) Prerequisite: Pre-calculus and permission of instructor.

This course will follow the AP Statistics syllabus and integrate use of the TI-83 calculator, statistical capabilities of Microsoft Excel, and other statistics software packages. The themes of the course include organizing data graphically, producing data via samples and experiments, studying probability, and performing statistical inference tests (i.e. chi-square, regression, and significance tests). Emphasis will be placed on both performing statistical calculations and writing concise and complete interpretations.


Classical Music, Popular Music, and Mathematics (1/2 credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course investigates the relationship between music and mathematics over the past 2,500 years. Students begin by learning how ancient Greek music influenced mathematics of the era and work their way up to seeing modern mathematical techniques of composing and studying music. Topics include various tunings, music composed with pitch-class sets, algorithms, and random walks, “math rock,” and studies attempting to determine a popular song’s success.




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